How to navigate through the Texas road conditions

Road conditions are proving to be challenging for road warriors on the Texan side of the border. 

On Wednesday, a new report found that nearly half of the country’s roads are “hazardous” or “extremely dangerous” for cyclists, pedestrians, and other motorists.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said that as of Wednesday, 1.1 million drivers and 11 million cyclists were using at least one vehicle on public roads in the United States. 

This is more than triple the number who had used a bicycle in the last 10 years, and represents a 15 percent increase from 2013. 

“While we’re confident the current road conditions are improving, we are also concerned about the impact on traffic,” NHTSA Director Robert M. Carey said in a statement.

“We’ve seen the toll on roads and drivers in other states, and we have not seen any of these numbers in the U.S. yet.” 

Texas was ranked second in the nation in traffic fatalities in 2017 with 679,742, according to NHTAS, which added that the state was the most dangerous for pedestrians. 

According to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, the average annual travel time for a driver was 10.9 miles in 2017. 

Traffic accidents in Texas jumped nearly 8 percent last year. 

In the U:  Trailblazer reported on the number of road deaths in Texas in 2017, with 9,500 deaths, a record high.

 According the NHTASS, more than 50 percent of the Texas death toll was caused by drunk driving, and another 40 percent was caused because of traffic injuries.

“The number of fatalities in Texas is not necessarily a good indicator of the overall health and safety of the state, and the death toll continues to rise,” the agency said in its statement. 

The highway deaths in 2017 were the worst since 2008, and they are far more than the number that would have occurred had there been no new federal highway construction. 

Earlier this month, Texas Governor Greg Abbott signed legislation that allows the state to declare “road emergencies” that require drivers to slow down and avoid certain intersections. 

As a result, highways will be marked as “hazard” and “dangerous” in the next two weeks.